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  • remote-controlled microscale robots

    https://bionautlabs.com/bionaut-labs...ain-disorders/

    Anyone have any insights into this technology? The article I read seemed very encouraged by it, but I'm not sure if that was just PR or real analysis.

  • #2
    I didn't find a clear answer but I think it's still in preclinical phase?

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    • #3
      I think so, the people who brought it to my attention were Venture Capital people, and I think the company is either raising money to try to run a human clinical trial, or have just finished raising the money.

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      • #4
        That looks very cool but there is a huge problem. Targeting. If there is a remote control robot, how would they know where the tumor cells are?

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        • #5
          The press release describes the way they target the cells as "Live X-ray" I'm not sure if they mean Fluoroscopy or something else.

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          • #6
            I meant they can target it by looking at a tumor on mri and brining the drug to the tumor mass but they can not see the scattered tumor cells a few inches from the tumor mass like an antibody can.

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            • #7
              I see what you mean now. How do they deal with that issue when they use CED for brain stem tumors?

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              • #8
                It depends on the drug.. if it is a regular chemotherapy, it has the same problem. It will kill that 95% of tumor that is visible on the scan and that you can hit with the CED but that just buys time and the tumor will eventually return. The drug does diffuse out of the area but the concentration becomes so low so fast that it is not effective anymore really once it hits the edge of the CED distribution field.

                We are working on a CED project now trying to get it into humans, which is a smart bomb. 1/2 of the drug targets a specific marker on the surface of tumor cells, and the other 1/2 is a toxin that kills the cells that the drug binds to. It doesn't indiscrimantly kill all cells or all dividing cells. So you target the main tumor mass and a small margin with the CED but then it also diffuses a little out to the surrounding tissue and only kills tumor cells. At least in theory. It works on rats. Probably won't get to cells that are too far from the main target area but this could be a great part of a cocktail approach inclusing a vaccine. The vaccines should work good but are limited in numbers so they can't kill a large number of cells. So combine something that kills most of the cells in the main tumor mass, some cells in the surrounding area, and mop up with a vaccine. Might work.

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                • #9
                  Ok I think I understand. I should look at these CED trial as an attempting to find one part of what will probably be a multipart solution to these difficult brain tumors.

                  Also if you don't mind me asking, how does your smart bomb differentiate itself from the above Robots? Could they work together, since the robot is just delivering the bomb, rather than being the bomb itself.

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                  • #10
                    I do not think that any one treatment by itself is going to be the cure.. The robots are directed by external magnets to target what is seen on the MRI scans. They can deliver any drug.. so why not GB-13. They can bring the drug into the correct area instead of CED.. so yes - maybe it is possible.
                    What I said above was if the robots were delivering chemo drugs.. but they can also deliver antibodies or mRNA or anything really.

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