Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Treatment Outcomes of Persistent Radiation-Induced Alopecia in Patients With Cancer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Treatment Outcomes of Persistent Radiation-Induced Alopecia in Patients With Cancer

    Treatment Outcomes of Persistent Radiation-Induced Alopecia in Patients With Cancer

  • #2
    Al Musella's Comments: (This is his personal views and are not necessarily the views of the Musella Foundation!)

    Radiation induced alopecia is hair loss due to damage from radiation therapy. This article talks about how to treat it, starting with something really easy - rubbing a cream on the skin. This resulted in complete response in 16% of people but it helped 82% of the people who tried it. If that doesn't work, there are harder things to try. So if you have a bald spot from radiation and it bothers you, go to a dermatologist and show them this article.

    Comment


    • #3
      Any idea where to get minoxidil easily? Prices seem all over the place.

      Comment


      • #4
        Angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels) around glioblastomas is primarily mediated by VEGF (Vascular endothelial growth factor). Those blood vessels bring oxygen and nutrients to the tumor site and make it grow faster. You may be familiar with Avastin (bevacizumab), an antibody against VEGF used for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma.

        Minoxidil works by induction of VEGF. It's absorption through skin is enough to cause systemic side-effects. My main concern is could Minoxidil as an VEGF inducer stimulate glioblastoma vascularization and growth.

        Comment

        Working...
        X